Fisherman's Voice talks Aquaculture Co-op - Maine Scallop Aquaculture Coop Works Toward Fishery Diversification

Recently a few of our co-op members talked to Fisherman's Voice about our burgeoning co-op, here's the story

A group of nine midcoast fishermen and aquaculturists have joined together to form Maine’s first scallop farming cooperative. The Maine Aquaculture Co-op is starting small, setting up scallop farms on three aquaculture lease sites, with applications in place for a fourth... Read More

Learning About Scallop Spat Collection

 Early in the fall, Dana Morse from  Maine Sea Grant  and Hugh Cowperthwaite from  CEI  visited Tenants Harbor to conduct a session on scallop spat collation for local fishermen and aquaculturists. From that project 10+ fishermen set spat bags in Maine's Penobscot Bay area - in the Two Bush Channel, around Green Island and Matinicus Island.  The trajectory of growing scallops begins with setting spat (seed) bags in September to capture scallop spat, which typically settles in the spat bags in mid-late fall.  Spat bags remain in the water through late spring, by which time the spat has grown to scallops about 7mm-15mm in diameter.  In spring, scallops are washed from the spat bags   and are ready to be grown out.

Early in the fall, Dana Morse from Maine Sea Grant and Hugh Cowperthwaite from CEI visited Tenants Harbor to conduct a session on scallop spat collation for local fishermen and aquaculturists. From that project 10+ fishermen set spat bags in Maine's Penobscot Bay area - in the Two Bush Channel, around Green Island and Matinicus Island. The trajectory of growing scallops begins with setting spat (seed) bags in September to capture scallop spat, which typically settles in the spat bags in mid-late fall.  Spat bags remain in the water through late spring, by which time the spat has grown to scallops about 7mm-15mm in diameter.  In spring, scallops are washed from the spat bags and are ready to be grown out.